Module 13

Visualization: Depicting Numbers

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Do you need to communicate financial data, research statistics, or other types of quantitative information but find it difficult to make it engaging? You’ve probably discovered that many audiences shut down when they see screens filled with statistics or data. That’s because the display of numerical facts can easily become meaningless. It is too easy for numbers to be seen as abstractions.

In this module, we will see that there are many ways to make numbers relevant and meaningful. You will see how to liven up the design of statistics and to present data so they are comprehensible. You will find solutions for taking the boredom out of numbers.

Goals and Outcomes

Goals

During this module, students will:

  • be exposed to the best practices for designing with numbers
  • understand the impacts of visualization for learning and instruction.

Outcomes

After completing this module, students will be able to:

  • identify the impacts of visualization for learning and instruction
  • choose wisely between a graphic and a table to present numerical data
  • make statistics visually appealing
  • identify the best practices for designing with numbers.

Selected Readings

Required

  • Chapter 16 from the following book:
    Malamed, C. (2015). Visual design solutions: Principles and creative inspiration for learning professionals. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.

Recommended

“To Do” List

Before and After #12: Visualization

Please read the Before and After Assignment description page for further details about this assignment.

Outcomes

After completing this assignment, you will be able to:

  • identify the impacts of visualization for learning and instruction
  • choose wisely between a graphic and a table to present numerical data
  • make statistics visually appealing
  • identify the best practices for designing with numbers.
Instructions
  1. Identify an image (before image) that violates visual design principles regarding Visualization introduced in Chapter 16. Save your before onto your computer.
  2. Create a new file (1200 x 1800 pixels, 72 Pixel/Inch) with Adobe Photoshop.
  3. In the new file (after image), recreate the same information in the before image, but make each visual element comply with visual design principles introduced in previous modules and Chapter 16.
  4. Upload both before and after images, including JPG and PSD files, onto a Weebly page.
  5. In a paragraph (between 200 – 400 words), describe explicitly why the before image fails to comply with the visual principles and how you corrected it with your new design.
  6. Examples:
    – http://patiencelockeportfolio.weebly.com/before–after-graphic–12.html (by Patience Kotwa)
Submitting and Posting
    1. To submit your work, post URL of your Weebly page to the corresponding link under Submissions inside Moodle before 11:59 p.m. U.S. EST/EDT on the following Monday.

on the following Monday.

Grading

Your work will be graded based on the following requirements:

  • Both images are uploaded (1 pt).
  • The after image contains the same information presented in the before image (1 pt).
  • The after image complies with visual design principles introduced in previous modules and Chapter 16 (2 pts).
  • The narrative description is provided and it explicitly examines both images using visual design principles introduced in Chapter 16 (2 pts).